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How Much is an iPod Worth?

How much is an ipod worth


In a file photo dated 2015, an iPod, iPod Nano and iPod Shuffle are displayed at an Apple store in New York.


In this 2015 file photo, from left, an iPod, iPod Nano and iPod Shuffle are displayed at an Apple store in New York. AP Photo by Mark Lennihan

Apple announced that it’s discontinuing the iPod, so is now a good time to sell your old iPod?

Apple introduced the first iPod in 2001, revolutionizing the way we listen to music, and Apple products can surprisingly hold their value. From Apple’s vintage original to the final 7th generation iPod Touch, here’s how much your old iPod is worth.

How Much Is an iPod Worth?

Your iPod’s value will depend on the model, age, condition and storage capacity. At the lower end are iPods with heavy cosmetic damage, while on the higher end are iPods in excellent condition, often with large storage capacities.

There are five categories of iPod: the Classic, Mini, Nano, Shuffle and Touch. You can go to Apple’s support page if you need help identifying your iPod model.

The estimated prices are subject to change and are based upon data found as of the publish date. The sale prices are based on sold and completed listings from online auction and e-commerce sites, including eBay and Amazon.

If you have a broken iPod, you should assume that the estimated value is even less, but you can try selling it as-is for a lower price.

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Value of the iPod Classic

Price range: $30-$1,000

The most valuable iPod Classics are the original 1st generation, a piece of Apple history, and the final two generations, which are still usable today. All sell particularly well if they are still in their original packaging.

Apple released six versions of the iPod Classic over its lifetime, with the last model announced in 2007 and discontinued in 2014.

iPod Classic

Generation Condition/Packaging Selling For
1st Good to excellent condition $200 to $500
1st Original packaging $1,000
2nd Good condition At least $150
2nd Perfect condition with all the accessories $300
3rd Good condition $50 to $100
4th Good condition $36 to $60
5th and 6th Good to like new $60 to $180

Value of the iPod Mini

Price range: $20-$150

The Apple iPod Mini was a successful, scaled-down iPod that introduced the famous Click Wheel. The only decent price you can get for the iPod Mini is if you have it with the original box in excellent condition.

iPod Mini

Generation Condition/Packaging Selling For
All Good condition $20 to $60
All Original box, excellent condition As high as $150

Value of the iPod Nano 

Price range: $20-$350

The Apple iPod Nano was the successor to the iPod Mini, featuring smaller-capacity solid-state flash memory. The iPod Nano’s design changed wildly over the seven generations it was offered from 2005 to 2017.

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Starting with a Click Wheel, the Nano eventually became a touch-screen device. The 1st generation iPod Nano is seen as a collector’s piece when it’s a sealed, new in-box device.

iPod Nano

Generation Condition/ Packaging Selling For
1st, 2nd and 3rd Sealed, new in box Up to $350
1st, 2nd and 3rd Used $20 to $60
4th and 5th Good condition $30 to $100
6th and 7th Good condition Starting at $25
6th and 7th Sealed in original boxes Up to $250

Value of the iPod Shuffle

Price range: $10-$160

Designed as a cheaper alternative, the iPod Shuffle lacked a screen, forcing the user to rely on a shuffle feature that randomly played music. The shuffle lasted from 2005 to 2010 and had six different generations.

As with the others, the most valuable Shuffles are in their original boxes.

iPod Shuffle

Generation Condition/ Packaging Selling For
1st Original box $50 to $160
1st No box $10 to $25
2nd Good to sealed in box $15 to $70
3rd Good to sealed in box $15 to $80
4th Good $30
4th New, in-box Up to $150

Value of the iPod Touch

Price range: $20 to $600

The iPod Touch was introduced in 2007 and continued selling up until 2022. The last generation to be produced included up to 256 GB of storage and Apple’s A10 Fusion SoC. Values can range wildly, depending on the age, condition and storage.

Apple is continuing to sell the iPod Touch 7th generation for up to $400 while supplies last, but don’t expect them to last for too long.

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iPod Touch

Generation Condition/ Packaging Selling For
1st Good condition with original box & all accessories $20 to $50
1st New, in box Up to $600
2nd Good condition $20 to $50
3rd Good condition $20 to $50
4th Good condition $25 to $80
5th New in box, larger capacity Up to $100
6th Good condition $30 to $120
7th Used, good condition $130 to $330

Where Should I Sell My iPod?

If you are looking to sell your old iPods, start with online classifieds such as Facebook Marketplace or the OfferUp app for Android or iOS.

You can list your vintage iPods there for free, and they do not collect any fees if you sell the devices in person. If you list the devices as shippable, you’ll need to pay applicable fees as well as the cost of shipping (if you don’t charge your buyer).

You can also sell your old iPod on eBay. It charges fees to its sellers, but you will get a broad audience to sell your device. Take clear photographs and list your iPod at a competitive price.

For the best chance of selling your old device, research what other people are selling the same iPod model for in your condition and storage size.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Is an old iPod worth anything?

iPods can be worth as little as $10 and as much as $1,000, depending on its model, age, condition and storage capacity.

What is an iPod Touch worth?

Apple’s iPod Touch can be worth anywhere from $20 to $600, depending on the generation. While a new, in-box 1st generation sells for as much as $600, other models fetch prices that barely cover their shipping cost. 

What iPods are worth the most?

The iPod with the most value is a sealed, in-box iPod 1st Generation from 2005. The original iPod can sell for around $1,000 in a well-preserved state. A sealed, in-box iPod Touch 1st Generation for $600. A sealed, in-box iPod Nano 1st Generation for $350.

But I heard ‘this’ iPod is worth thousands?

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There are rare models that have sold for thousands of dollars in the past. In general, the market has changed since many of these iPods were originally sold.

Michael Archambault is a senior writer for The Penny Hoarder specializing in technology.


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