CEO & Founder at Zido Freight & Logistics, overseeing the company’s global operation.

There has been quite a buzz around the “electric vehicles by 2030” phrase, and more players are showing interest in this space. With the announcement from Volkswagen about its move to build six electric vehicle battery factories in Europe, it is clear that no manufacturer, even Tesla, will enjoy a monopoly in what is going to become the future of road transportation.

I have observed that third-world countries struggle to keep up, probably because of the infrastructure and technological demands of adopting electric vehicles, but it is only a matter of time before they will have to. Electricity-powered transportation is where the world is headed, and every country will have to follow suit.

Understanding The Roadblocks To EV Adoption In Third-World Countries

Most third-world countries depend on neat secondhand vehicles that are imported and sold in their numbers majorly because that is what a significant percentage of the populace can afford. If the European countries that are the first users of these vehicles are on the way to phasing out fossil-fuel vehicles, it is only to be expected that, in time, the imported fairly used vehicles will be electric vehicles.

This technology promises a lot of benefits, particularly for the environment, which will have reduced carbon emissions in the event that fossil-fuel vehicles are phased out completely. Concerns about charging time and driving time are already being addressed by different manufacturers so that charging time is reduced and driving time increased.

For third-world countries, the concerns go beyond charging and driving time. The availability of relevant infrastructure for charging and maintaining the vehicles will play a huge role in how electric vehicles will be accepted and adopted. Even in European countries right now, infrastructure is still an obstacle to a wider acceptance among buyers. If there is no infrastructure, plans or concepts on the ground to make this transition seamless, it may turn out to be more difficult than we envisage.

The Role Harnod’s Regenerative Energy Concept Could Play

So let’s talk about the Harnod regenerative electric vehicle concept. I remember experimenting with this as a young engineering undergraduate. My recent thoughts along the electric vehicle line brought this idea back up to use the Harnod regenerative energy concept, a method I think stakeholders in this industry should think about and perhaps run with.

The Harnod regenerative energy concept works with the idea that every rotational motion can be converted into electrical energy, independent of the source of the motion and provided that the source motor and the generator motor are separated to avoid a clash.

What this means is that it is possible to generate some percentage of the energy being used at every point the car is in motion. Is it not a law that energy cannot be destroyed but can be converted from one form to another? Well, Harnod says that there is a design that will convert the rotational motion of the motor present in the vehicle to regenerate a portion of the energy and send it back to the battery.

With Harnod, users would not have to bother about battery capacity but rather about the percentage of the power that is being returned to the battery since it is a given that some of this energy might be lost. This means longer driving time, and while it does not undermine the need for charging infrastructure, it means that third-world countries could kickstart the use of electric vehicles using the cluster approach, setting up one charging station at a time and in selected locations.

With some energy regenerating from Harnod and a prompter alerting the driver to their reduced battery power, drivers could plan their driving so that the energy takes them to the next available charging station. Time could also be saved as one can now use the charge-on-the-go feature and schedule recharging for a less busy time of the day.

Another point of view is that the Harnod regenerative concept would not necessarily require a high-capacity battery, as the charge-on-the-go feature would make up for it. This will then make the electric vehicle a cost-effective replacement for fossil-fuel vehicles and greatly reduces maintenance costs.

How Leaders In The Industry Can Get Started Using This Approach

Any EV manufacturer with a strong technical team can go through the Harnod concept and see how it is adaptable to the brand of vehicles they are selling. It is, of course, something that might increase the purchasing cost for customers, but it would greatly reduce the maintenance cost of the vehicles in the long term. With proper brand communication, I believe customers will accept it.

Imagine what it would look like if electric vehicle manufacturers decided to work with this concept and reduce the overall cost and inconveniences of road transportation and logistics around the world. After all, if the cost of transportation can be effectively reduced, the cost of logistics would likewise go down, and I say this as the founder of a logistics company.

Ultimately, this would be a move toward the green energy concept, and the ozone layer will be better for it.


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